Home Grownups Travel On the way to happiness: thoughts on life and time

On the way to happiness: thoughts on life and time

by Heini Hirvonen
onnea
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I look out the window. Big, white snowflakes float slowly to the ground. The dark doesn’t feel quite as dark, even though it is the early morning hours. The youngest child, sick with chicken pox, has finally fallen asleep after hours of crying. I can’t sleep. I wrap the bathrobe around me and sneak downstairs to check that the fireplace lid is closed and the frost won’t creep in. I press my hand against the fireplace stone. A gentle warmth spreads from my palm to the rest of my body. I make a cup of tea and start writing.

The greatest luxury in life is time.

The past couple of years I’ve thought a lot about the meaning of time. Have I considered time a given; a foregone conclusion? Do I run after things too much? A few years ago I had to face the limits of my life. I learned to appreciate time in a new way. I also learned to appreciate the choices that define my time. I left the ifs and buts behind. I left unnecessary people behind. I stopped caring about what other people thought about me. I started to actively do things I wanted to do. Several things changed. I changed.

When I let go of who I am. I Become what I might be.

Lao Tzu

Birthdays follow one another. Life becomes segments divided by bigger parties, children’s births, and trips. High school didn’t end some five years ago, but in fact quite a while back. In a few weeks I turn forty. I couldn’t care less. What is happiness and what does it mean, in real life? To me, it is the choices to live my life in my own way.

Happiness is, in the end, dependent on such small things. It’s happiness to be stuck at the door, talking to a colleague. Happiness is picking up a cappuccino from a coffee shop where people know me by my name. Happiness is sitting on a couch talking to a friend for hours, drinking red wine. Happiness is looking into a child’s bright eyes and smiling back, secretive. Happiness is to push your body to its limits and then lay in a yoga class in a stupor. Happiness is laughing with your spouse. The list is endless. Luckily.

Emma Seppälä’s new book ”Happiness Track” has three pieces of advice, which speak to me at the moment.

  • Stop chasing the future.
  • Do more by doing nothing.
  • Lower the RPM’s.

After I read the book it was a relief to realize that you don’t need to respond to all the demands that you place on yourself. It’s enough to be content in the here and now. What makes you happy?

It feels good to be lost in right direction.

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